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children's future brighter, we will invest in our education system. from before they enter kindergarten to the time they leave higher education, we must prepare them to succeed in a 21st century economy. and if we are sincere in our concern for the next generation, how we deal with one another matters, not only during this session but also throughout the campaigns that bring us to these positions of public trust. every day, our kids watch what we do and learn from our example. members of the 63rd legislature, what i ask of you tonight is simple and straightforward: first, be responsible with our budget, because i won't allow you to spend more than we take in or make cuts that undermine our long-term stability. second, join me in focusing on creating jobs, investing in education, and making government more effective, and lastly, act in a manner that we're not ashamed to have our children watching, because they are. i am taking these principles to heart, and we've hit the ground running to create better jobs, better schools and a more effective government. a company recently came to the s
the process of a carbon constrained world as a means to invent a more prosperous future and drive education and industry and jobs and growth. we can act like the heart of a forward moving country whose eyes and ears are open to the world. i believe that all of us here in maryland are truly covered by the shield of his goodness. we need only the goodness to let go of falsehoods, mention this, the shortsightedness of rash and in balanced decisions, the things of our past that no longer serve. once leaving them behind, we will make a new world free from fear and worthy of our children's love and trust. thank you all very much. [applause] >> he talked about job growth in his plans to improve education in the state. it is 45 minutes. thank you, president pro tem dempsey, speaker jones, judges of the missouri supreme court, lieutenant governor kinder, state officials, members of the legislature, members of my cabinet, and my fellow missourians. this evening it is my pleasure to be joined by missouri's outstanding first lady, georganne nixon, and our son jeremiah. this has become one of our most h
and most prominent advocates of science, technology, and engineering, math and education, some of you know them as a member of the school state board. later this week president obama will be awarding him the national medal of science for his achievement in physics. dr. james gates. [applause] two years ago, and that just two years ago, this woman has turned around a workplace into a full-time job. please welcome janice in caroline county and melissa jones harris. [applause] within the heart of every individual is a spirit and a dignity that yearns to be recognized. 12 months ago outside, the officially recognized for the first time in 380 years, the people in a ceremony that none of us will soon forget. please welcome the tribe. [applause] thank you for being here. we're also joined by someone who found himself doing the job of a city manager. when his own home was flooded, he set aside his personal needs an extended her day and night to help the families in the cities through the crisis. mayor p.j. mayor? [applause] my fellow marylanders, the story of dr. gates, the story of janice and me
of education. last year the house passed a bill to allow governors the appointment of superintendent. i cannot state how important this change is. all we are asking is that we give the voters the opportunity at the ballot box to make this constitutional change. the south carolina house of representatives report -- of representatives supports it. let us give them that opportunity. they deserve it. [applause] now to the department of administration. each of the last two years i have made the argument of ridding our state of the big green monster that is the budget control board. some of you have made that argument with me. for me to do so again tonight would be redundant. i believe most of you know that it is the right thing to do. instead i will make this observation -- if one came to south carolina from another state or country and saw the way the department of administration bill was handled last year, he or she would surely be confused. the senate unanimously voted in favor of it, a large majority in the house voted for it, and it still did not pass? how is that possible? how did the senate
will discuss a national school choice week and the education options available to students across the country. first, we want about what's coming up on c-span2 and c- span3. 3's an2's booktv and c-span american history take -- american history tv ticket to santa fe, new mexico. that is coming up at noon -- a visit to local literary landmarks, interviews with authors from the area. here is a clip from santa fe writer james morris as he talks about joseph pulitzer and his book. >> i am james mcgrath morris. behind me stand some early printing presses. this seemed like a perfect place to talk about the man who revolutionized american newspapers. what i for started working on the book, people would react with recognition when i was writing about joseph pulitzer. it was clear from their expressions of anger about the name and not anything about his life. he shares his fate with alfred nobel, which is being well known for prize, but not well known for what he did in his life. alfred nobel was an explosive munitions maker. few people understand the significant role joseph pulitzer played in american
of the battle for talent and our insane policy in this country of educating individuals that have great talent and intellect and then telling them they have no opportunity to pursue careers in the united states. also to recognize that many first-reneurs, are generation americans or early arrivals in our country. there are visa provisions that allow for an increase in the number of stem visas but also for those that are foreign born but that one to create business and the united states. in addition to that, we believe that having some competition among states through information and knowledge will increase the opportunity for entrepreneurs to decide where they can start with a new idea and beginning company. -- begin a company. i hope what we learn from a community's efforts in regard to sopa and pipa with a demonstrated they have the ability to stop legislation, i would love to see the circumstance in which they have the ability to promote legislation to see that in his past. we are taking the approach that this legislation is not perfect. seeking input from you and others, i have been to sout
budget is up to 20% and the next decade is 30% of our budget. it takes away from education, infrastructure, other health and human service needs. so medicaid and the need to have flexibility is something we are go to go watch as we go forward. let me finish where i started. we need to address the rising costs of health care. i don't think the affordable care act does that. we have provided an opportunity with our health care exchange in utah is a model based on good principles that allows businesses to provide as a benefit and health with competitive forces and consumer control to, in fact, have an impact on the rising costs of health care. it may be imperfect, but it's a step in the right direction. again, the fundamental position i'm taking and we're taking in utah is that the free market works if you allow it. and takes politicians like myself and others to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so anxious to fix the problem, that we don't let the marketplace make the adjustments necessary to get the right outcome. and again as i sa
that education and training cannot overcome intense market incentives. a vocal, point for payment reform has been mentioned. aha a committee is a secretive group of doctors that wields tremendous influence over medicare reimbursement rates. the cms and adopts nearly all of their recommendations. at a minimum, the public deserves transparency. but yet, we should establish rates of thing that is not favoring narrow specialties. the federal government and ama are colluding to bring an end to the primary care physician work force in the united states. in summary, it is clear that health insurance provides better health outcomes, including a decrease risk for death. despite this, we will leave 30 million uninsured. i have worked for over a decade in medical education as a student, resident, fellow, and a faculty member and program later. it is my conviction that public responsive training should meet the health care needs of our population, and rather than the staffing needs of hospitals or the lifestyle preferences of young doctors. >> my understanding is that senator franken has to leave, and you wa
the money on the 25-year term demanded by his education secretary? will he speak in plain language, maybe in latin, to the education secretary? perhaps he might say -- optamus schola nova, we need a new school? >> i'll leave the latin to the mayor of london but would have a word with the education secretary. what i would say to him is it you look at school capital budget as a whole, they are equivalent to what the previous labor government did in their early terms. the money is there. in terms of the banks, the funding lending scheme from the bank of england, evidence shows it is having an effect on lowering interest rates and reforming p.f.i. but also offering infrastructure guarantees, something the treasury never has done before to help projects go ahead. >> damian hinds? >> nothing is more important in the early years education than the caring people delivering it. does the prime minister agree raising the bar and elevating their status will help the prestige to the profession and help parents give children the best start in life? >> i think my honorable friend is absolutely light and
them to be harvard educated, and glue them on top of what is becoming increasingly a very violent and islamist uprising. there are over 1000 militias fighting in syria. the syrian opposition today, which america helped put together, are a bunch of harvard educated liberal people that we would like to will syria in the future. because we hope that we can glue them on top of this islamic militia and quiet them down. we said exactly the same thing about iraq. what do we have? we have a shiite a picture ship. they were not secular. they were religious. the neocons got everything wrong on what would happen to iraq. it will get it wrong on what will happen in syria. mockers he is not happening in syria anytime soon. the only two social indicators that have any reliable connection to whether democratic experiments work, are median age and per capita income. those -- our median age is 30 and above, you stick to democracy 30% of the time. per capita income, about $10,000 per person. syria, the median age is 20 one years old. iraq it was 21. syria has a per capita gdp of about $1000. we are
'm grateful for his education and there is no comparison between the quality of this man and chuck hagel. they are in different sandboxes. i'm very grateful for people like this who we desperately need in times like this. >> we go to the independent line. this is doug, welcome to the conversation. caller: thanks for taking my call and thanks to c-span. i think the only one that had any sanity and knew the questions that were going to be asked. we did not get any answers to them. how is the decision made? what are the requirements? the independent said we should have a court that regardless who the president is they should not have a unilateral way to document nominate someone. people in this country don't know about the mddaa, the national defense thorgs act which allows the president to designate a person who he feels is a terrorist or supporting terrorist organizations to deprive him of life, liberty and not be able to go in front of a court. you can't say listen, you have the wrong person. we can be unilaterally detained. there is no question about, for instance, the propaganda guy th
research and education. cuts to military personnel and law enforcement. cuts that will cause jobs and do real harm to the american economy as it struggles to recover. and the reality is that we don't even have that much time. we only have nine legislative days left in february to address the issue. nine days to negotiate a trillion-dollar deal with the senate and the president. and instead of a meaningful plan to address the crisis that we need to avert, we have this nonsense before us today. this is no way to govern. the disturbing truth is that many republicans seem downright giddy when it comes to the sequester cuts. there is new story after new story of how we'll let the sequester take effect. the gentleman from georgia, dr. price, couldn't support these cuts fast enough. i was shocked. mr. speaker, it was only last week that the economic numbers for the fourth quarter of 2012 were released. unexpectedly we saw a contraction in those numbers, a contraction fueled by a massive reduction in defense spending. what do you know, huge cuts in government spending during a fragile economic r
. investment in education, research thomas development. -- of research, development. republicans and democrats have worked together to reduce our deficit by $2.5 trillion. that is a good start, but to get the rest of the way, we need a balanced set of reforms. for example, we need to lower the cost of health care like programs like medicare. we cannot pass the burden. these reforms must go hand-in- hand with eliminating excess spending in our tax code so that the wealthiest cannot take advantage of loopholes and reductions that are not available to most americans. 2012 can be a year of solid growth and more jobs and higher wages. -- 2013 can be a year of solid growth and more jobs and higher wages. everyone in washington needs to focus on what is right for the country, on what is right for you and your families. that is how we will get our economy moving faster. it will strengthen our middle class. we will build a country that rewards the effort and determination of every single american. thank you. have a great weekend. >> hello. my name is susan brooks. it is a pleasure to speak to you from
bonuses simply refuse to lend the money on the 25 year term demanded by his education secretary? would he speak in plain language, maybe in latin, to the education secretary? [laughter] we need our new school. >> i will leave the latin to the mayor of london if that's all right but also to have a word with the education secretary. what i would say to him is if you look at school capital budget as a whole, they are equivalent to what was previously labour government did in his earlier to pick the money is there. entrance of the banks, the funding for lenny seen from the bank of england, i think it is having an effect at lowering interest rates. we are reforming but we're also offering infrastructure guarantees, something the treasury has never done before, to help projects go ahead. >> thank you nothing is more important than the caring people delivering it. does the prime minister agree that raising the bar, elevating their space will help us teach the profession to poor parenting to children the best possible start in life? >> i think my honorable friend is right and i would pay tribute
of the healthcare spending. that is an important point. >> let's switch to another passionate topic. education. quite a few questions from the audience on how much can we afford to fund and where should we be funding and investing in the educational system? should it be done on a national level or a state level? >> let's mix it up, you go first. >> i have read that test scores of american elementary and secondary educational students have not increased and the famous nation at risk report in the early 1980's. even though spending has increased dramatically. i question whether the solution to the problem is, let's take those systems and pour money into it are. it's hard to argue against earning more money, that and possibly hurt. but you basically have major structural flaws in the way the system is organized. it is not producing the results that we need. i strongly believe that -- i would say, after entitlement spending, i would put the quality of our educational outcomes as the greatest long-term threat to america's economic strength. it is the most important thing, and it has to do with stru
mailers in march, next month, and will be conducting a number of educational efforts to make sure we reach all business customers. as we get closer to the delivery scheduled change in in august, we will be publishing information in post offices, putting it online and other customer contact to make sure our residential customers know. let me conclude with a couple of thoughts. this announcement today is just one part of a much larger strategy to return the postal service to long-term financial stability. the plans saves $2 billion annually, that we have a $20 billion gap to close. we are striving to raise revenues, reduce costs and gain efficiencies throughout the entire organization and making this change to our delivery schedule is a big-ticket item and simply too big of a cost savings to ignore. in fact, i would strongly argue it would be irresponsible for the postal service not to pursue this course. second, we are implementing this approach to improve our overall business performance. there is a strong and growing demand for our package service and we need to meet that over the coming
were all going to act, no matter how we were involved in the project of educating our kids -- we were going to put our kids first. that sounds like obstruction, but when you are in the hard work of having to close schools, it gives you an ability to remind people of what the interest of kids.ch is acting in whether it is our compact or whether it is here, particularly here, because of the detailed nature, it does give us a road map. and i think it holds together. employer verification, a path to citizenship, making sure we are not rejecting talented people from other countries that have a ph.d. is and a real contribution to make here, and so on all of these things, in a substantive way, hang together. but the politically hang together. over years of debates on immigration reform, it has been clear what the component pieces are that are necessary for a large deal. i can filibuster all day long, but i do think colorado, in some sense, it is unusual, maybe. we seem to -- the ski resorts of mentioned earlier -- a huge number of moving pieces. >> part of politics is put yourselves in the s
to meet basic criteria, like pursuing an education, then we will consider offering you the chance to come out of the shadows so that you can live here and work here illegally. so that you can finally have the dignity of knowing you belong. but because this change is not permanent, we need congress to act, and not just on the dream act. we need congress to act on a comprehensive approach that finally deals with the 11 million undocumented immigrants who are in the country right now. that is what we need. [applause] now, the good news is, or the first time in many years, republicans and democrats seem ready to tackle this problem together. [applause] members of both parties in both chambers are actively working on a solution. yesterday, a bipartisan group of senators announced their principles for comprehensive immigration reform which are very much in line with the principles of a proposed and campaigned on for the last few years. so at this moment it looks like there is a genuine desire to get this done soon. and that is very encouraging. but this time, action must follow. we cannot allow
they did an incredible job of educating voters about scott brown's ties to big oil. that was essential in my victory. when carl row started pouring money into new mexico to defeat me, they pushed back to help sure we won this race. so pretty powerful endorsements from races where we worked. let me close with a few forward looking comments on the second obama term. sp despite these electoral victories, we believe congress is a dysfunctional place to do business and we think advancements in congress on environmental policies are slim. that means the main opportunity for forward progress in the next few years with the president authority through executive action he can take. we anticipate that we'll continue to see pretty broad and sweeping attacks on our air, our water, our land, our wild life from the boehner led house of representatives and in the senate we anticipate our senate allies will stand strong against these misled attacks. as i said, this election cycle demonstrated there is strong support for addressing climate change. this is heightened in the wake of super storm sandy and
to me. she was great. she is articulate, very well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos. but the press would not give her the same accolades, the general media would not give for this and accolades, not because she was competent, but because of her political ideology. there is some dispute bi -- skewed bias rating hillary clinton for some of the wrong things. host: on twitter -- "the washington post" adds this as far as analysis of her time in office -- "many of clinton's successes appeared to be due largely to her personal popularity and famous work ethics, attributes that were on display in her final days in office." nevada. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. i think the only reason she ever had her job was because of her husband, bill. she did exactly what she has been told to do by the president's, and a lot of us are not on tune with president obama's schedule, especially this benghazi deal. whenever a person throws her hands up in the air and is not want to admit to any responsibility of a job done po
and strong supporter of catholic education, i once again this year introduced a resolution honoring catholic schools. h.res. 46 expresses support for the vital contributions of the thousands of calt lick elementary and secondary schools -- catholic elementary and secondary schools in the united states and the key role they play in promoting and ensuring a brighter, stronger future for our nation. i'd like to thank the 28 members who co-sponsored this bipartisan resolution with me. since 1974 the national catholic education association, the united states conference of catholic bishops have organized and planned national catholic schools week. this year's theme, catholic schools raise the standards highlights recent initiatives undertaken by catholic schools across the country to strengthen the already exemplary standards. america's catholic schools produce graduates with the schools and integrity needed by our businesses, governments, and communities emphasizing a well-rounded educational experience in instilling the values of giving back to community and helping others. nearly every catholic
this imbalance, congress created the children's hospital graduate medical education program. this is a program that was created and has been sustained with bipartisan support. unfortunately the program is facing elimination. president obama's budget for the 2012 fiscal year called for elimination of the program, despite the positive results. i support getting rid of programs that are duplicative, unproven or unnecessary. especially with the budget pressures we're facing now. however chgme has a proven track record. over 40% of pediatricians in the united states are trained through chgme. 43% of those in subspecialties are trained through the program. the children's hospital of philadelphia runs the largest pediatric residency in the country. the residents will treat children in my community and then move across the country to practice in other communities. we need their expertise now more than ever. last congress i worked with commy democratic counterpart on the -- my democrat counterpart to renew the program. our legislation passed the house of representatives twice in the 112th congress, bot
-time work since. college-educated, 20 years of experience. i live in san francisco in an area where did score -- where discrimination based on age is encouraged. discrimination based on race is encouraged as well. it is a shame. my senators, basically if you are not from a protected class, you do not exist. these people -- i saved up a lot of money over my life and had planned on retiring at 65, like everyone else, but i spent a lot of my retirement just trying to survive, which is a shame. host: was your retirement 401k? personal savings? how did it break down? caller: it was a mix. host:-, n.c., joe is joining us on the independent line. -- ash, n.c., joe is joining us on the independent line. caller: all of a sudden everything fell apart several years ago. i could have retired, but i saw the writing on the wall, businesses started falling down and everyone who has a retirement, god bless you, but it is so hard. i feel bad for the grandchildren who they all say are not going to make it. it is terrible, this country has put a hole in front of everything else. they have got to quit doin
to help them with housing, education, career training, the list goes on and on about what these kids deserve to rebuild their lives and recover from the tra maw. it may surprise you to know that most states child health care services do not consider a doe metically trafficed youth as a victim unless they are trafficed by a family member. we need to change the status of the discovered sesk traffic kid from slut, which they were called as the wonderful action tow visit holly smith. when the arresting officer pulled her off the track and rescued her. he swore to her to the police station and left he have suicidal. a survival told me that the police would pull up and tell the girls to take off their heels off and run. these laws are men to bring back these young people their dignity and give them the life they want. those laws that are supposed to help they actually harm survivors. in 2010, a law was passed and this made them state that they are focusing on helping the women caught up in this crime. since 2010 she has convicted 17 individuals of human trafficking. however, chicago police
with great education and great skills know their job security is fragile. as a way to protect yourself, people like to think that that could never happen to me. i am good enough that i would not lose my job or if i did, i would certainly be able to find something away. in some ways by turning on the unemployed and putting it on them, in some ways, there is a bizarre defense mechanism that makes people feel more secure about their own jobs in a fragile economy. i think there is a lot of complex factors going on here. it is certainly eroded very deeply in a complete misunderstanding of just how bad the economy and the recovery has been. host: what is the best way to protect these people? guest: is important for them to be honest and talk about why you lost your job and talk in detail -- if it was because the company went under or there were massive layoffs or the industry were working in started suffering -- talk in detail about all you have done to try to get re-employed. employers don't wish -- don't want to hire lazy people. people are out there actively looking. discuss the creative
efforts to educate members of this committee and the public. we will resume the hearing. the gentleman from california is recognized without penalty for the loss of any of his five minutes for that destruction. >> can i get an extra minute for this one? >> may be. >> first of all. in several ways i want to associate myself with my good friend from illinois. i am one month, nine days older than you. that does not mean there is any real difference in us as baby boomers. we're going to exit the scene and i do not want to exit the scene without resolving an immigration problem that predated my interest and the gentleman's entrance into congress. that group of disruption did not understand my politics. i do believe we can get to unsubstantial if not complete immigration reform bill. it is my hope that this is that window of opportunity. i do have some concerns from earlier. i want to associate myself with ms. lofgren. i heard you say we should grow different crops in california as a resolution to the leading -- needing labor we cannot seem to find. is that pretty well correct? >> i am sayin
want to point out, which will be live it 10:00 a.m. on c-span3 is education secretary arne duncan talking about waivers for the "no child left behind" bill. on c- like a 10:00 a.m. span3. robert is on our republican line for seamless. should sequestration be allowed to go through? caller: hi. we were calling it the fiscal cliff. all the sudden it seems we have gone away from that and we are calling it sequestration. i thought that the whole term "fiscal cliff" came about because sequestration was part of that. the media keeps differentiating that now. host: you don't see a difference? caller: it is still sequestration, that is the fiscal cliff. that has not gone away. host: semantics aside, what would you like to see done? caller: just for the media to clarify we never really got anywhere except for slight increase in taxes on a small number of people. it was $450 million and above. how many people actually dropped checks of? ? host: $450 million? caller: $450,000. excuse me. i don't know anybody that's actually gets a check of that amount, or maybe a bonus. i don't know. nonethel
, consumers cannot expect what is happening right now. i do not know it is possible to educate millions of millions of consumers as would need to be educated to actually have this be meaningful. we are going to have to look hard at collection and use and all of the different things we have to talk about regarding information practices in order to see with the middle ground is here. there is a whole lot of bell curve in the area of policy making. there is the currency side with people have a thick use 9-a teacher lithosphere of the technology -- people have a diffuse, non-articulate fear of technology. we are not going to be able to stop the deployment of this technology. the question is, what is the next step. >> you worked pretty extensively on facial recognition best practices, something the organization has been talking about for a while now. about that as you sketch out the perspective. >> i do not want to represent the hill perspective. i need to stress that anything i say on the panel should be considered my personal opinion and thoughts, not the congresswoman for him i work. the
. it's appropriate i do this at georgetown. as the product of jesuit education, as a catholic and as a beneficiary over the years of your outstanding faculty and staff and your important policy contributions that this university has made in a number of areas that affect people of this country. i'm truly honored to have this opportunity today. i've had a deep and abiding respect for georgetown throughout the almost 40 to 50 years that i've been involved in public service. and i have a deep respect for the generation of leaders that have gone forward from this campus to serve our nation. i just had the opportunity to meet with your cadets. some of the cadets in the rotc program. as someone who went through the rotc program at santa clara university and then ultimately served two years in the army, i can tell you that i have tremendous admiration for those that have made the decision to serve this country in uniform. the talents of these men and women and the innovative programs at georgetown's new institute of women, peace and security underscore for me the university's leadersh
like education and training, energy and national security will cost us jobs, and it will slow down our recovery. it's not the right thing to do for the economy. it's not the right thing for folks who are out there still looking for work. and the good news is this doesn't have to happen. for all the drama and disagreements that we've had over the past few years, democrats and republicans have still been able to come together and cut the deficit by more than $2.5 trillion through a mix of spending cuts and higher rates on taxes for the wealthy. a balanced approach has achieved more than $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction. that's more than halfway towards the $4 trillion in deficit reduction that economists and elected officials from both parties believe is required to stabilize our debt. so we've made progress. and i still believe that we can finish the job with a balanced mix of spending cuts and more tax reform. the proposals that i put forward during the fiscal cliff negotiations in discussions with speaker boehner and others are still very much on the table. i just want to repeat, th
are struggling during this financial crisis. we get calls related to those. we are trying to educate homeowners about that so they did not become victims in the first place. but a lot of people will lose their homes of the situation. host: christy romero, special inspector general for tarp. the question about the teeth -- question of to this executive pay, if treasury signed off on it, what can sigtarp really do? guest: we make recommendations to treasury and a half to be dealt with. we also report to congress. we send these reports to congress and congress helps put teeth in it. but a ultimately we have a lot of recommendations that are not implemented and they need to be. this is an example that shows how bad it can be a treasury does not implement the recommendation. i am looking forward to a new secretary of treasury coming in to talk about those recommendations and changes that can be made. and we will not give up. we will look at 2013 pay. we will not stop. because alternately we are here to protect taxpayers. host: amelia, ohio. democrats' line. caller: how are you? my question is about
educated for the 21st century economy. that means making investments in education. it means trying to address the situation where even as we have for 35 straight months in private sector job creation, we have for much of that time seen job loss in state and local governments. that is a portion of it. in education, schoolteachers, the president has put forward proposals. this is his highest priority. it is important to look at things like immigration reform. businesses have vocally and publicly, as an economic necessity -- the economic benefits of comprehensive immigration reform are manyfold and very important. that is the principal reason the president believes we need to come forward in a bipartisan way and get this done. there is every reason, both economic and otherwise, he to continue to make the progress that has been made, that we have seen. and get it done. get a bill passed that represents the consensus that is building who, he that reflects the principles that are shared by the bipartisan group in the senate, and make it law, make it a fact. >> are there any changes in th
to live without. embarrassment's and education and infrastructure. research and development -- investments and education and infrastructure. already republicans and democrats of work together to reduce deficits by $2.50 trillion. that is a good start. to get the rest of the way, we need a balanced set of reforms. for example, we need to lower the cost of health care and programs like medicare that are the biggest drivers of the deficit. these reforms must go hand in hand with eliminating excess spending in the tax code so the wealthiest individuals can ticket veg of loopholes and deductions the kind of bailable to most americans. it can be a year solid growth, more jobs, and higher wages. that will only happen of reporters up to self-inflicted wounds. host: the president in his weekly address. the earlier debt limit with $16.40 trillion. we have surpassed that. you can keep track of it at usdebtclock.org. it is now $60.50 trillion. the next debate over the debt limit is likely to come up mid may. a story from "the weekly standard." we need a better argument against the debt. she writes --
. the education of poor people in the inner-city does not take away from others, it expands our economy and makes us all do better. this is the ideal of our country. as the rabbi would tell me, the jewish saying, that jews together are strong, but jews with other people are invincible. he african saying that spiderwebs united can tie up a line. the very principle of this country, one of my advisers told me one of the fundamental principles of islam. the oneness of the community. we recognize dependency and see strength. that became the problem solving idea that i took on. i began looking at what other cities around america were doing. i came over to mayor bloomberg, who i called the obi-wan kenobi of mayors. all of us young padawans come to see what is going on over here. i could not wait to talk about climate change. the time is now. we just focus on cities where the carbon output is significant. if we do pragmatic things, we are going to make change. he started showing me programs he had that created jobs, including the health of cities like mine that has exit -- epidemic asthma rates. i went t
problems and provide assistance. frankly, we also need to educate the force. you have to have peers who are working alongside of you who can identify those problems. someone looks like they have problems, they are having a difficult time, to identify that and make sure that that person gets the help they need. it is like everything else. all of us need to be aware -- all of us need to be a part of the answer to be able to make sure that doesn't happen. but this is something that -- there is no silver bullet. there is no silver bullet here. i wish there was. it means we have to operate on every front to do with this. -- deal with this. we have to be able to make sure that we deployed people in a rational basis so they are deployed into a combat area, but then have an amount of time that they can get their lives back together again. and do it rationally. that has to be done. we have to provide the support system, the health care system, be able to educate the force, to understand and to recognize those kinds of problems. all of that needs to be done if we're to address this. most importan
court, there's one in affirmative action, higher education at the university of texas. we can see a decision in that probably soon. it was back in october, i think voting rights case out of alabama questioning the continuing wisdom and constitutionalty of a law, the section of the voting rights act that requires states certain jurisdiction. i'm not talking about the confederacy. to clear any election regulation be it moving your poling location from a firehouse to a schoolhouse by the federal government. it is not correlated of voting rates of minorities. so we're probably going to see the supreme court strike that down which will make waves. and of course, a couple of gay marriages are before the court. it is highly unlikely that the supreme court this term will strike down all restrictions on gay marriage, require all states to provide it. the cases they took can be decided without reaching that point. one is the defensive marriage act, section three about federal benefits that the federal government has to give certain benefits to people who are lawfully married in their state
to reach out to the industry to come up with a way to really promote financial literacy and education before college level, getting into high schools so that we have an educated group of young folks who come out and understand about the importance of having a financial house in order, the importance of having a good credit history, the understanding what it means to be smart about using credit. >> you can watch that entire conversation with the chamber of commerce this afternoon right after the farewell ceremony for secretary of defense leon panetta, which is expected to start at about 3:45 p.m. eastern, and next tuesday night, president obama delivering his fourth state of the union address to a joint session of congress. it includes the president's speech at 9:00 and the republican response from florida senator marco rubio. that will be on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org >> first lady helen taft on discussing politics. >> i always had the satisfaction of knowing almost as much as he about the politics and intricacies of any situation. i think any woman can discuss with her husb
the background check, pay back taxes, pay the fine, or gotten an education, served in the military i got into the back of a very long line -- could you comment, mayor castro, on those possible compromise alternatives and what seems to be most consistent with who we are? >> i believe you laid it out well in the extremes you have. mass deeper tissue up 11 million million people, that will not happen. we will not open up the borders. the bipartisan proposal and the president's proposal represents an effective compromise. this is our earned citizenship. the alternative is a recipe for creating a class of second class, noncitizens of the united states. >> thank you. >> last but not least, the gentleman from georgia is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you. one of the good things about being last is that you get to listen and hear a lot of questions and your a lot of hyperbole -- hear a lot of hyperbole. i have heard a lot of discussion and a lot of well what if we don't do this it will be horrific. i come from northeast georgia. mary agricultural district. it is on the border of atlanta.
to come to the country, to escape and get an education and level playing field can transform lives. escaping conflict and hardship is one thing, picking a home is another. we are a country that embres justice, we reward fairness, we are a nation of laws. the poorest of the poor has the sametanding in court as the richest of the rich. we believe in the even application of the law because law provides order, structure, predictability and security. and what we cannot become is a nation where the law is enforced selectively or not at all. what we cannot become, mr. chairman, where laws are applied to some of the people some of the time. the president from time to time, mr. chairman, sayshat he want a country where everyone plays by the same rules. with respect, they aren't called rules in this country, they're called laws. anea of us takes an oath to enforce them, including those with which we may disagree. because when theaw was ignored or applied in an uneven way, we see erosion of the foundation upon which this republic was built. and make no mistake, mr. chairman, as surely as one
spending, we cannot just cut our way to prosperity. deep indiscriminate cuts to education and training, energy, and national security will cost us jobs and it will slow down our recovery. it's not the right thing to do it for the economy. it's not the right thing for folks out there still looking for work. host: your reaction? guest: the president was serious about not slowing down the economy, he would get a handle on his environmental protection agency and stop some of the regulations. he would approved the keystone pipeline. that is something that has been sitting on his desk a long time. there are things that could be done to help the economy apart from the sequestered. the reason the sequester is tough is when you pick up the federal budget and say we will try to find savings in the budget, every single line has a constituency and a lobbyist somewhere, whether it is a municipal organization, whether it is a big defense contractor, everyone has something that interests them. that's why it's difficult to say we are one to take out this line of that line when there is a loser in that
was great. she was articulate, well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos, but the press would not give her the same accolade. the general media would not give her the same accolade, not because she was not constant, but because of her political ideology. i think there is some bias in reading hillary clinton -- rating hillary clinton. >> that was lawrence from -- host: that was lawrence from st. paul. "the washington post has this as far as analysis -- nebraska, on the republican line. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. think the only reason that she ever had her job was because of her husband built. she has done exactly what she has been told to do by the president, and a lot of us are not in tune with president obama's schedule. especially when we have at least lousy deals, whenever a person throws her hand up in the air and does not want to admit to any responsibility of the job done poorly that killed some of our american -- not happy with her performance ticket she is just mirror of -- performance. she is j
as an economic question and get anything that you want. >> we spend a lot of time talking about education in the foreign policy debate. >> when you were there in the middle of the first debate, the one that the president was said to have them poor, as this was happening, was that your impression? >> no. >> what was your impression? >> the impressions that are going on, i considered more than one thing at a time, and i believed that romney was doing better and i thought that he was doing well. my own rule is that mitt romney is talking, and obama is standing here, i only look at mitt romney and i never look at the other candidate. i don't want to be a party to his reaction. the consequence is that when mitt romney was talking i did not know, even though i was closer to him than anybody, i was not watching the reactions of barack obama. the only time i looked at him as when he was talking. i cannot help but notice a couple of times he did not look at me, i did not have the impression. >> in the vice-presidential debate, did you see or hear anything that we, as television viewers of the deba
they wait, children see their parents deported. students get stuck in an educational purgatory and can't attend college and better their lives in a country that trained them. and mothers and fathers can't provide for their family or care for their loved ones without keeping them in the shadows. so they can't wait any longer. we can't wait any longer. and as rosa parks said, it is just time. from africa to europe to asia, our dysfunctional immigration system is a disincentive to the best and brightest worldwide from coming to our great country. we throw talent away. we tear families apart. we show disregard for those trying to live the american dream. for far too long, we have put off comprehensive immigration reform, but now we are taking up the opportunity to do something about it. and we cannot let this moment pass. it is in that spirit that we hold today's discussion. we will not wait any longer. we have to continue strengthening our border, but we will act on comprehensive immigration reform without delay. we will crack down on employers, but we will make sure there is a pathway to
strategic investments in education, science, research and critical infrastructure necessary to compete in the global economy. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the house will be in order. the gentlewoman from pennsylvania is recognized for five minutes. ms. schwartz: thank you. i rise in opposition to this bill and to offer the final amendment that will not kill the bill or send it back to committee. if adopted, the bill, as amended, will immediately proceed to final passage. this amendment rejects the rigid partisan view presented in this legislation that deficit reduction must be achieved by spending cuts alone regardless of the consequences. moving from one crisis to another and failing to meet our responsibilities as republicans have done time and time again has hurt our economic growth. most recently in december, our economy contracted for the first time in three years. as a result of delayed action by republican leadership in the house. this amendment makes clear there is a better way. it recognizes that our nation faces serious financial challenges. we agree,
is knowing your background, knowing your jesuit education and knowing what your values are, i know that you will be very forthcoming with this committee. to speak truth about our and even when it is uncomfortable. that is not an easy way to go. >> truthfulness with a value that was put in me and my parents. it still is to this day. honesty is the best policy. none of us are perfect beings. i would commit to that i would be honest with this committee. it would be my objective to make cia your favorite intelligence agency. [laughter] >> well, i think you are pushing your luck now. thank you. >> senator leven. >> thank you for your willingness to serve here. my question is this, in your opinion does water boarding constitute torture? >> the attorney general has referred to water boarding as torture. many people have referred to it as torture. as you well know and we've had the discussion the term torture has a lot of implications. it is something that should have been banned and it should never have taken place in my view. if i go to c.i.a. it would never be brought back. >> do you have a pers
a real education and in the last two years, i've gotten a chance to work on senate races around the country. i did the east and there were two of us and i did wisconsin east so i have a full half of the country for the 2012 cycle. it was a fascinating two years to be in politics. i would echo what marlon said that campaigns matter. i would love to talk about that even with a gigantic influx of money, the basic fundamental elements of campaigns still very much matter. i actually think there is an inverse relationship to the amount of money that comes in. i think the more television commercials we have, the more media get back its permit people, the more important it becomes to adhere to the basics and remember you have to come to the race with the right candidate for the wright state for the right time and not forget those things in an effort to push somebody in who you think might not win. i love my time at the dscc are started in 2011 and my first day was the week after we had essentially recruited now senator joe donnelly into the race in indiana. he was the first race that i
, and it will help refine and educate the house members about what this bill is all about in ways where it may be just as going to talk to them could not, and so i think that those things are important. a good number of republicans go through the regular way. >> asking a question, which i think is a safe topic for overtime questions, but first, what did i miss? is there something that should be button down here that i did not ask? >> moderate read state democrats -- red state democrats from montana, those that voted against the plan in 2007 -- >> i am not going to speak for any individual senator. look. we are going to get the overwhelming majority of senators, but we do not expect to get them all, so we will need a number of republicans to vote for the bill to get 60. >> all of the young people have a copy of the politico, which is required reading. there will be a written quiz on today's edition. [laughter] >> senator mccain, you mentioned senator kennedy in your remarks, and it was talked about senator schumer becoming the deal maker. he had influence with his democratic colleagues and the
, america's part was brokered 120 -- was broken when 20 young children and dedicated educators were murdered. this is the first judiciary committee in of the 113th congress. i want everybody here to join the discussion as part of a collective effort to find solutions to help insure that no family, no school, no community ever has to endorse such agree this tragedy again. we have to come together today as americans seeking common cause. i hope we can forgo sloganeering. it is too important for that. we should be here as americans. every american abhors the recent tragedies. in just the last two years, an elementary school in connecticut, a movie theater in colorado, a sacred place of worship in wisconsin, in front of a shopping mall in arizona, americans are looking to us for solutions and for action. this committee is a focal point for that process. i have introduced with having law enforcement agencies to enforce restricting gun trafficking. others want to ban ammunition clips and others have proposed modifications to the background check system to keep guns out of the wrong hands while not
have the nerve fiber to carry that weapon, and the responsibility? you are an educator. you dedicated your life to that pursuit, but you have a side arm strapped to yourself? and you better have it at all times because if you put it in your desk drawer, your purse, briefcase -- let me tell you something, carrying this weapon by my side has been a pain all my years. i am glad i have it if i need it, but it is an awesome responsibility. what do you do in the summertime when you dress down? how will you safeguard the weapon from a classroom of 16- year-old boys who want to touch it? certainly -- holsters. i am spending $200 apiece for these. these are all factors. we all face catastrophic changes in our lives as we go through divorce, other things that bring us down. but you need people to step in, like we have been policing, to notice those things and deal with them. this is a major issue. >> we have had cases in which trained police officers who were off-duty responded to a situation. because they had not been adequately trained in how to respond off-duty, because there were out of uni
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